Looking for information about North Carolina? There’s a website for that!

Monday, September 16, 2019

Love North Carolina history and culture? Looking for information about North Carolina? There’s a website for that! NCpedia is North Carolina’s online encyclopedia, with more than, 8,300 articles and 9,170 images. Explore this sampling of recently added content and visit the website at ncpedia.org

The Way We Lived in North Carolina, a social history of North Carolina from the region’s first peoples to the early 2000s

Cover art to the print publication of The Way We Lived in North Carolina, published 2003 by UNC Press with the N.C. Office of Archives and History.

The Way We Lived in North Carolina, a new collection of short encyclopedia-length articles, tells the social history of the state from its first peoples through the early 2000s. The articles cover a range of topics from rural and daily life through different eras to the development of industry, transportation, energy and infrastructure that changed the region from a state of small family farms to the industrial, business, technology, science and educational hub it is today. 

The collection provides an overview of these changes in brief and broad brushstrokes for a general audience. It includes numerous images and maps and links to other NCpedia content, providing numerous opportunities to delve deeper into a variety of historical topics. The content in this collection has been excerpted from the original single-volume print book publication of the same name, published by the North Carolina Office of Research and History in 2003.

African American History and Biography

Additionally, new content focusing on African American history and biography includes articles on:

  • John Dudley Ray, educator, agriculturalist and North Carolina’s first African American Farm Maker’s Club Agent; by Netta S. Cox, North Carolina A&T State University.
  • David King Cherry, college professor, distinguished WWI veteran and president of Kittrell College; by James R. Stewart, North Carolina A&T State University.
  • Susan Wright Sampson Dudley, educator, dramatist, and civic leader; by Shavon Stewart, North Carolina A&T State University.
  • Martha Josephine Oxford Sebastian, pioneering leader in librarianship; by Anthony Arcangeli, North Carolina A&T State University.
  • Selma Hortense Burke, American sculptor and member of the Harlem Renaissance movement; by the N.C. Government & Heritage Library.
  • Andrew Arthur Best, physician and civil rights leader from eastern North Carolina; by Steven A. Hill.
  • Bennie Robert Rountree, Pitt County civil rights leader and president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference; by Steven A. Hill.
  • William Spencer Creecy, minister and pioneer North Carolina educator from Northampton County; by Steven A. Hill.
  • The Green Book, also known as The Negro Motorist Greenbook, provides a brief history of the publication that helped black travelers navigate and avoid difficulty on the road during Segregation and includes information about North Carolina locations and links to digital collections; by the N.C. Government & Heritage Library.

Women’s History and Biography

Nine new articles on North Carolina women show how She Changed the World

Portrait of Selma Burke seated next to her sculpture of Booker T. Washington. Taken during the 1930s while she was working for the WPA Federal Art Project. From the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

  • Susan Wright Sampson Dudley, educator, dramatist, and civic leader; by Shavon Stewart, North Carolina A&T State University.
  • Martha Josephine Oxford Sebastian, pioneering leader in librarianship; by Anthony Arcangeli, North Carolina A&T State University.
  • Selma Hortense Burke, American sculptor and member of the Harlem Renaissance movement; by the N.C. Government & Heritage Library.
  • Sister Mary Michael Boulus, graduate of University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Catholic educator and educational activist in Lebanon; by Erin Lawrimore, University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
  • Dixie Lee Bryant, 1891 graduate of MIT and charter science faculty member at what is now UNC Greensboro; by Erin Lawrimore, University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
  • Eloise Patricia Rallings Lewis, graduate of Vanderbilt, educator, member of the Army Nurse Corps, charter faculty member of the UNC School of Nursing, and first dean of the UNCG School of Nursing; by Erin Lawrimore, University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
  • Annie Vellna Scott, graduate of what is now known as the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, physician, and professor of pediatrics at the School of Medicine at UNC-Chapel Hill; by Erin Lawrimore, University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
  • Virginia Layden Tucker, alumna of the North Carolina College for Women and pioneering computing engineer; by Erin Lawrimore, University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
  • Alma Holland Beers, botanist, artist and research assistant at the University of North Carolina botany department; by Claire Richie.

North Carolina Miscellany

Last, but not least, general topics on North Carolina places and interests include:

  • Temperance Hall, an historic structure in Scotland County believed to be the only structure in the state to house a temperance society; by Ray Linville.
  • North Carolina Birding Trail, a network of more than 300 viewing locations across the state providing habitat for more than 400 bird species; by Ray Linville.
  • Laurinburg-Maxton Army Air Base, WWII installation for developing airborne operations and training glider pilots; by Ray Linville.

Thank you to our partners and contributors!

A big thank you to our content partners and newest contributors who shared this content with NCpedia! Support their efforts and learn more about these fascinating people, places, and times by following the links above or visiting NCpedia!

About NCpedia

Containing more than 8,300 articles, NCpedia is North Carolina’s online encyclopedia. Coordinated by the N.C. Government & Heritage Library and freely available 24/7, NCpedia contains information about the state covering a broad range of subjects, from state symbols, county information and histories, biography, history, government, and arts and culture to geography and climate, natural heritage, and more.  

Author: 
Kelly Agan, Digital Projects Librarian